Deciphering the Health Benefits of Aroniaberries

Posted by Eat Purple on 11/5/2014 to Super Snacks

If you follow health and diet-related news, the chances are good that you've heard about Aronia Berries. You may have heard them referred to as Aroniaberries, or Chokeberries, though that last term obviously didn't originate with anyone in charge of Aroniaberry marketing. Around here, we simply call them Superberries, for two reasons:

1) The health benefits that aroniaberries, the featured ingredient in Superberries products, provide are about as super as it gets. 
2) Superawesomehealthyberries would be too hard to remember.

If you don't keep up with the world of health, and terms like "Antioxidants," "Quercetin" and "Anthocyanins" seem to be in a foreign language (They actually are English), then perhaps a few down-and-dirty definitions will help you appreciate what these amazing - even super-amazing - berries can do to improve your overall health.

Antioxidants

Oxidation, when it occurs in the cells of your body, is a very bad thing. When oxidation occurs, it creates free radicals, which can affect your DNA and lead to illness, diseases and overall poor health like cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and other health issues that you don't ever want to experience. Antioxidants combat these free radicals by reducing the amount of oxidation that occurs. While some antioxidants are naturally produced in our body, there are so many toxins, pollutants and other chemicals in our environment that adding more antioxidants to our diet just makes good common sense.

Quercetin

While too long to be a really good Scrabble word, quercetin scores high when it comes to your health. It is a flavonoid, or a plant pigment, and if you eat onions or grapes, or drink the occasional glass of red wine, your diet already contains at least a small amount of quercetin. Clinical tests have shown that quercetin acts as both a natural antihistamine and anti-stress agent, suppressing come nasty enzymes contained within our body's individual cells. These enzymes produce histamines and a hormone called cortisol, which causes stress. It is also believed to help balance blood pressure by stabilizing both systolic and diastolic pressure in our arteries.

Anthocyanins

Like quercetin, anthocyanins are pigments found in fruits and veggies that cause them to turn red or blue. There are more than 600 anthocyanins that occur in nature. The anthocyanins contained in the deep purple aroniaberries (quick color lesson: blue plus red equals purple). In addition to producing even more of those healthy antioxidants, anthocyanins are believed to anti-inflammatory and anti-viral benefits as well.

So, now you know a little bit about the nutrients found in aroniaberries. We invite you to add Superberries  to your current diet.