Eat Your Way To Better Blood Pressure

Posted by Superberries on 2/21/2017 to Health Tips

Several recent studies show there may be a correlation between lowering the blood pressure and the foods that we eat. This bodes well for the possibility of treating hypertension in more natural means with less emphasis on the synthetic pharmaceuticals.

A 2012 study performed by Australian researchers found a connection between low-fat milk, low-fat yogurt and a reduced risk of high blood pressure. The common consensus was that calcium and peptides may play a role in the reduction of the blood pressure. However, further study is needed to either confirm or deny the possible benefits of dairy on blood pressure. Other studies point to flaxseed as a beneficial food for lowering both systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. Researchers say there may be a link between reduction of blood pressure and the alpha linolenic acid, lignans, peptides and the fiber contained in flaxseed.

A 2010 study performed on the benefits of dark chocolate on the blood pressure showed promising results regarding the flavonols in the chocolate and their effects upon both systolic and diastolic levels. Dark chocolate may help form nitric oxide in the blood vessels, which helps ease the circulatory flow. A diet rich in olive oil was linked in a 2013 study to a drop in the blood pressure of several at risk women. Olive oil is rich in polyphenols and Omega 3 fatty acids, which have been shown to be beneficial to the circulatory system in numerous ways.  

Feel the beat of the beet. That's right, red beets and beet juice are high in nitrates. The nitrates in the beets have been shown to lower blood pressure levels and aid circulation in several recent studies. One serving of unsalted pistachios a day also may aid in the reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The indications are that the oils from the nuts may actually strengthen the blood vessels thereby working to assist healthy blood flow.

One glass of pomegranate juice consumed daily might aid in the reduction of blood pressure levels. Researchers in the United Kingdom suspect there may be a link between the potassium and the polyphenols found in the pomegranate juice and lower blood pressure levels. Three servings of fatty fish, such as salmon and sardines, had a positive impact on blood pressure levels in separate studies performed in Spain, Portugal and Iceland. The researchers indicated that fish high in Omega's helped lower both systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels.  

A British study released in 2010 shined a spotlight on consuming whole grains, such as oats and whole wheat, three times weekly as a potential benefit for lower systolic blood pressure levels. The research is ongoing on the whole grains and the researchers found little change in the blood pressure levels of those consuming refined grains. A 2010 study at Tufts University found that drinking hibiscus tea three times daily led to lower blood pressure in people with mild cases of hypertension. Hibiscus tea contains powerful antioxidants such as polyphenols and anthocyanins which may lead to lower blood pressure levels and increase circulatory function.

Finally, a study published in the NIH (National Institute of Health) showed exceptionally promising effects of the Aronia Berry on blood pressure in mild cases of hypertension. The researchers indicated that the high amount of anthocyanins and flavonoids contained within the Aronia extracts may have a marked affect upon the blood pressure, though more research is still needed to confirm these findings.

While there are many promising indications that some of the foods we eat may lower the risk of hypertension and stroke, there is still much more research to be performed. Researchers will say, however, that a well-balanced diet is integral to continued health and wellness. The best advice, they say, is to consult with your doctor on any dietary changes. In the meantime, keep "eating purple" and boost your antioxidants with Superberries Aronia Berry Products.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3600185/

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/food/lists/foods-that-lower-blood-pressure/slideid_1392

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